Sarah Joseph M.S., CSCS

Workout Blog

Vance is getting old. Aging and Metabolism

Posted by Sarah on April 17, 2015 at 5:00 AM Comments comments (0)

This weekend Vance is having a birthday so I thought it might be appropriate to discuss how we can attenuate the effects of aging through proper exercise and nutrition. Without further adieu, let's talk about aging and metabolism! 

Metabolism and Aging

Aging tends to be an unkind process when it comes to human physiology and functioning. You may have noticed some weight gain yourself over the years and I’m going to discuss some possible causes for that.

You’ve heard it before; If you consume more calories than you expend you are likely to gain some weight. There is more at play here than calories in versus calories out but for the purposes of this article, we will regard this to be true. There are three components that determine how many calories you will burn in a day.

1. The first is your basal metabolic rate (BMR). This is the energy used at rest to power body function. Your BMR is determined by several factors including age, size, gender and lean body tissue (muscle). Each decade, this declines 2-3%. In order to attenuate increases in fat and loss in muscle, a resistance training component is crucial for any exercise program. Muscle tissue consumes three times the number of calories than fat (6 calories per lb muscle per day vs. 2 calories per lb fat per day). Maintaining this muscle will aid in metabolism maintenance.

2. The thermic effect of food is the second contributor to metabolism. This is the energy it takes for your body to digest food. It is unknown how this process changes with aging. Nevertheless, protein and fibrous carbohydrate require more energy to digest than fat. Mainly unsaturated but also saturated fat is still an important part of a healthy diet. The thermic effect of food is the physiologic reason why eating consistent meals will encourage a boost in metabolism (Farshchi, H.R., Taylor, M.A., Macdonald, I.A, 2004). Paid special attention to cite that one because food frequency is a hot topic right now.

3. Lastly, physical activity and exercise accounts for the remaining caloric expenditure of our bodies. Again, research is inconclusive as to whether the amount of calories burned for given activities is actually decreased with aging. At this point it seems likely that there is more of a lifestyle or conscious change to more sedentary behaviors.


We can’t evade aging but eating healthy and exercising will prolong years of health and quality of life. It is never too late to start exercising. You should never feel like you’ve missed the boat on being active. Just because you didn’t exercise when you were younger doesn’t mean that you don’t have the strength to start now. Start gradually. The important thing is that you are consistent and driven to learn what is needed to be done in order for you to reach your goal. In this way you can gain muscle mass while deflecting weight gain, high cholesterol, type II diabetes, hypertension, stroke and a host of other maladies that plague our population.



 


Shredded Chicken For Shredding

Posted by Sarah on April 13, 2015 at 2:10 PM Comments comments (0)

Saw a bunch of chicken recipies on Pinterest and decided to try my hand at the crockpot shredded chicken! Super simple recipie and you could definitely take the same concept and have it be a italian crock pot chicken. 

 

  1. 5 Chicken Breasts
  2. 1 Can of Crushed Tomato
  3. 1 onion
  4. 1 Small can of green chillis
  5. Various Mexican seasonings- Mrs. Dash Southwest, Chilli powder, Cayenne, Tumeric, etc., black pepper

Nutrition Facts

Servings 5.0

Amount Per Serving

calories 346

% Daily Value *

Total Fat 7 g 10 %

Saturated Fat 2 g 9 %

Monounsaturated Fat 2 g

Polyunsaturated Fat 2 g

Trans Fat 0 g

Cholesterol 146 mg 49 %

Sodium 564 mg 24 %

Potassium 506 mg 14 %

Total Carbohydrate 13 g 4 %

Dietary Fiber 4 g 17 %

Sugars 8 g

Protein 57 g 114 %

Vitamin A 67 %

Vitamin C 72 %

Calcium 7 %

Iron 17 %


 

Kicking the Habit - Carbohydrates

Posted by Sarah on March 20, 2014 at 1:55 PM Comments comments (0)

Welcome to the Shred Spot!

Hi everyone. Springtime is here! It is time to really start making a commitment to DO something about whatever it is in your life that you feel that you want to improve. For me that means stopping being addicted to sugar! As you'll notice, I don't really have a problem sticking to a workout schedule, however, I find myself wandering towards unhealthy carbohydrates after dinner every day. And now is the time to change that. Join me this week in cutting down on sugar. I'm going to be eliminating all processed carbohydrates!

I’ve already made great strides towards this goal after committing to do a Bikini Competition this April. A whole new diet and exercise program doesn’t mean that cravings are just going to disappear though. You may have heard fitness professionals say success is determined by 80% diet and 20% exercise…. But I maintain that it’s 50% mental, 30% diet, and 30% exercise.

 

So this week as you are being challenged to kick the simple carbs, (white breads, wheat breads, tortilla chips, French fries, ice cream….) start to recognize when and why you crave them. Once you understand this, you can take steps to change your habits and live a healthier life.

 

Personally I have found that I am more likely to go for the carb binge whennn…. 1.I’m tired 2.I’m stressed/ procrastinating 3.I’m alone 4.After 7:00pm 5.If I’ve already eaten something unhealthy 6.This is not surprising as consuming carbohydrates releases dopamine, a feel good hormone. Unfortunately, the feel good moment is fleeting and guilt sets in rapidly.

 

Steps I will take to prevent these carb vulnerable moments include…. 1.Brushing my teeth at 8:30 PM (not 7 because sometimes I have another meal to eat before 8:30) 2.Getting ready for bed an hour prior to the time I would like to go to sleep. 3.Saying no to plans if I know I have a lot to get done 4.Having visual reminders of why I am not going to eat the unhealthy carb •Ex. Wearing a bracelet with something personally inspirational on it, writing down health goals daily 5. Reorganizing fridge and cupboard so that unhealthy options are less readily available.

 

I feel like this is the only way I will be able to kick the habit.

 

Some tips for kicking your habit.... - listen to your body - journal to determine what is triggering you to do the undesired behavior (for me this means dwoddling around food after I'm already full) - avoid the stimulus - replace your undesired behavior with a healthier alternative etc. etc.

 

Let me know what you all do to help curtail your unhealthy cravings.

Where's the BEEF? All about meat.

Posted by Sarah on January 5, 2014 at 9:45 PM Comments comments (1)

Eat organic! We’ve all heard it. We all can’t afford it. We all need to learn how to prioritize what organic items we do purchase and why we’re trying so hard to eat organic. Here are some tidbits you might not already know about grass-fed meats as opposed to conventionally raised.

First and foremost, they are lower in total fat and as a result, they are lower in total calories. Why is this? Well fat has more calories per gram than protein does (9kcals/g vs. 4kcals/g). In fact, eating grass-fed can save you around 17,733 calories a year without changing any other health habits. One pound of fat contains 3,500 kcals so you could be saving yourself over 5 lbs of fat each year simply by switching to grass-fed!

Not only does grass-fed meat have a lower fat content, it also has 2 to 4 times more omega 3s than conventionally raised meat. Omega 3 is super important for brain health. Those who have adequate omega 3s in their diet are less likely to suffer from depression and Alzheimer’s. Have a risk of heart disease in your family? Grass-fed is for you. The omega 3s also contribute to a 50% reduction in heart attack risk and may even reduce risk of cancer. Only 40% of Americans get sufficient omega 3s.

Grass fed meat is also the richest known source of CLA (Conjugated Linolenic Acid). This is 3 to 5 times more than corn fed. CLA is important for preventing cancer. Those who had high CLA levels experienced a 60% breast cancer risk reduction over those with the lowest levels.

Vitamin E is crucial for reducing heart disease risk and cancer risk. Grass-fed meat has 3 times the level of vitamin E than grain fed.

Most Americans tend to eat more meat than is necessary. Therefore, investing in some organic grass-fed meat that is going to provide you with greater nutrition may be worth the investment. You might not literally be getting more for your money but the amount that you will get back in nutrition and health will be invaluable. Just eat a little less meat with each serving and the price should work itself out. More grass-fed for 2014!

 

Cilantro Lime Quinoa Salad

Posted by Sarah on August 18, 2013 at 12:00 AM Comments comments (0)

Cilantro Lime Quinoa Salad

  • 1-2 cups of cooked quinoa
  • half a sweet onion
  • 1 cup chopped cilantro
  • 1 clove of raw garlic
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1 can of beans
  • half a can of black olives
  • Black pepper
  • Paprika
  • Cumin
Click Here to see how it all goes together!

What should you be eating?

Posted by Sarah on May 19, 2013 at 10:10 PM Comments comments (0)

I recently read an article in Muscle and Body magazine concerning important dietary recommendations for active women. Of course it had a catchy title Six Top Nutrition Rules for Women as most magazine titles do. But let’s be honest, no one would read it without a catchy title. In this case, I’d consider this to be a good thing because the advice that this article had to offer seems to be sound. If it said 2 weeks for toned arms or something, I’d turn away because that article was likely written by someone who knows nothing of fitness.

One of the first points that the article makes is that many diets that are out there directed towards women are strict and are better suited towards women who don’t workout or get off of the couch. This is a sad but true fact because not only is this unhealthy for the woman who doesn’t get off the couch because she should be getting off the couch and the strict diet might not give her the energy to do so, but this is also discouraging for the exercising women because they may not gain strength, lose fat or increase stamina with these strict diets.

Because active women are breaking down more protein, burning more calories, and producing more free radicals than sedentary, their nutritional requirements are different! It’s so often that I see these otherwise fit girls in my classes sabotaging their best efforts with strict caloric restriction or simply over exercising and not giving themselves enough time to rest.

Remember you can be fit and fat and being fit and fat is healthier than being thin and unfit in terms of cardiovascular disease risk. But I digress, the point is that if you are an active woman and you’re constantly being encouraged by advertising and w.e. else to engage in unhealthy dieting practices remind yourself that in order to reach your goals of lifting more, running farther, doing more burpees in a minute, losing those last 5 pounds, you NEED plenty of calories, and you need whole “clean” foods. You don’t need 100 calorie bars; you don’t need 80 calorie yogurts loaded with artificial sweeteners.

 

If you were wondering what the Muscle and Body article said the six top nutritional rules for women were, here they are….

1. Include a full serving of protein with every meal

2. Eat small meals throughout the day

a. My comment on this is the be careful though… you still don’t want to be eating several large meals and going way over your calories. Not doing this can be difficult because chances are that the environment around you will be operating on the 3 meal a day system.

3. Have healthy fats with every meal

4. Stay hydrated

5. Replace high glycemic load carbs with fresh fare (leafy veg. legumes….)

6. Don’t forget your bones

 

Commentary on 6 Nutrition Tips

Posted by Sarah on April 19, 2013 at 12:55 AM Comments comments (0)

I recently read an article in Muscle and Body magazine concerning important dietary recommendations for active women. Of course it had a catchy title Six Top Nutrition Rules for Women as most magazine titles do. But let’s be honest, no one would read it without a catchy title. In this case, I’d consider this to be a good thing because the advice that this article had to offer seems to be sound. If it said 2 weeks for toned arms or something, I’d turn away because that article was likely written by someone who knows nothing of fitness.


One of the first points that the article makes is that many diets that are out there directed towards women are strict and are better suited towards women who don’t workout or get off of the couch. This is a sad but true fact because not only is this unhealthy for the woman who doesn’t get off the couch because she should be getting off the couch and the strict diet might not give her the energy to do so, but this is also discouraging for the exercising women because they may not gain strength, lose fat or increase stamina with these strict diets.


Because active women are breaking down more protein, burning more calories, and producing more free radicals than sedentary, their nutritional requirements are different! It’s so often that I see these otherwise fit girls in my classes sabotaging their best efforts with strict caloric restriction or simply over exercising and not giving themselves enough time to rest.


Remember you can be fit and fat and being fit and fat is healthier than being thin and unfit in terms of cardiovascular disease risk. But I digress, the point is that if you are an active woman and you’re constantly being encouraged by advertising and w.e. else to engage in unhealthy dieting practices remind yourself that in order to reach your goals of lifting more, running farther, doing more burpees in a minute, losing those last 5 pounds, you NEED plenty of calories, and you need whole “clean” foods. You don’t need 100 calorie bars; you don’t need 80 calorie yogurts loaded with artificial sweeteners.

 

If you were wondering what the Muscle and Body article said the six top nutritional rules for women were, here they are….

1. Include a full serving of protein with every meal

2. Eat small meals throughout the day

a. My comment on this is the be careful though… you still don’t want to be eating several large meals and going way over your calories. Not doing this can be difficult because chances are that the environment around you will be operating on the 3 meal a day system.

3. Have healthy fats with every meal

4. Stay hydrated

5. Replace high glycemic load carbs with fresh fare (leafy veg. legumes….)

6. Don’t forget your bones

 

Vegetables and Fruits Explained

Posted by Sarah on March 28, 2013 at 11:55 AM Comments comments (0)

Spiderman eats his fruits and vegetables, and here is why you should too. Fruits and vegetables, or I should say, vegetables and fruits (because veges have less sugar and you should eat more veges than fruits), have loads of vitamins. You always want to be eating foods that have plenty of vitamins because they are going to allow your body to work properly.

Why are they going to do that? What are vitamins? Vitamins are organic molecules that are essential for human survival. They exist in fat soluble and water soluble forms (that’s just one reason why you cannot eliminate fat from your diet!!).

With fat soluble vitamins, you are more likely to have build up and potentially toxicity. These vitamins are A,D,E and K.

Water soluble vitamins are the B vitamins and vitamin C. It is more difficult to have toxicity with these vitamins because you just pee the excess vitamin out.

So now that we know what vitamins are, let’s talk about a few reasons why we need them!

• Vitamins are essential links and regulators in many metabolic reactions that release energy from food- you need them to turn food into energy for your body

• B vitamins regulate metabolism

• Vitamins control the process of tissue synthesis… repairing the body

• They also protect the plasma membranes of cells (protecting them from oxidative stress)

 

Eye function- Vitamin A

Teeth- A, D, C

Blood cells- E

Hormone function- (steroids- vitamin A), pantothenic acid, thyroxine, B6

Neuromuscular function- A, B6, B12, thiamine, niacin, pantothenic acid

Cell membranes- E

Bones- A, D, C

Blood formation- B6, B12, C, folate

Blood clotting- K

Energy release- thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, biotin, B6, pantothenic acid

Reproduction- A, riboflavin

Skin- A, C, B6, niacin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid

 

No Cancer for me Thanks.

Posted by Sarah on February 2, 2013 at 10:00 AM Comments comments (0)

Hi everyone,


In my most recent youtube video, I talk about several ways to reduce your cancer risk, so you should check that out here... http://youtu.be/jtIqG2Dd7ZA. Let me know if you were surprised about anything that I talked about. If you have heard of some of the things that I talked about before, how has this information changed your habits? 

I am more aware of products and things that can influence cancer risk now, but they are just so abundant still that it is difficult to avoid them completely. 

Soon I will be participating in Relay for Life with other Health and Kinesiology students at GSU. If you found my video helpful, support our team in raising dollars to fight back against cancer. We've all be influenced by cancer in some way and I plan to take this opportunity to hopefully positively influence another person's life. If you'd like to positively influence someone's life today by making a donation to our team you can click here....http://main.acsevents.org/goto/TeamHKSarahJ. If you choose not to make a donation, I challenge you to do something nice for someone else today. There is never enough of that happening. 


Thanks for reading/ watching!


SJ

PIZZA ! and NYWS

Posted by Sarah on January 22, 2013 at 2:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Five. “Just do it”

Fast Forward to 8 minutes lol Unless you're looking forward to waste 17 minutes of your life.

Five. “Just do it”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYijY7r-j4g

Part 1

15 seconds rest, 50 seconds work

9 Rounds (10 minutes)

Manmakers- triceps p.u., rows, feet in, jump/ stand, overhead press

Low Burpee side hop- half burpee, hop to side

Pike Press P.U.

Part 2

10 seconds rest, 50 seconds work

8 rounds (8 minutes)

split squat jumps

frog leg sit ups

skaters

pushups w. superman

Rating of Perceived Exertion______________

 

PIZZA

http://www.kitchenminions.com/2011/09/buckwheat-pizza-dough.html

 

  • 2 1/4 teaspoon active dry yeast
  • 1 3/4 cups buckwheat flour, divided, plus some whole wheat flour for dusting
  • 3/4 cup warm water, divided
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 tablespoon olive oil

 

 

1. Stir together 2 1/4 tsp yeast, 1 Tbsp flour, and 1/4 cup warm water in a large bowl and set aside for 5 minutes.

2. Pour 1 1/4 c flour, 1/2 c water, 1 t salt, and 1/2 T oil into the bowl with the yeast and stir until smooth. Once the dough is smooth, stir in flour until the dough pulls away from the bowl but is still wet.

3. Knead the dough on a floured surface, lightly adding flour when the dough becomes too sticky. This takes 5-10 minutes.

4. Form the dough into a ball. Place it in a greased bowl and cover with a kitchen towel. Let the dough rise for about 1 1/4 hour or until doubled.

 

 

 

 

5. Preheat the oven to 500 deg F, lower the oven rack to the lower third of the oven and place a pizza stone on the rack. (If you don’t have a pizza stone, just preheat the oven).

 

6. After the dough is done rising, remove the dough from the bowl but do not punch down. Dust some flour over the dough and move to a parchment lined pizza peel or baking sheet without any sides. Stretch out dough evenly, spreading it as far as you can without tearing it.

 

7.Spread sauce over dough, leaving a 1-inch border, and sprinkle cheese over that.

 

8. Slide pizza and parchment onto pizza stone (or onto a baking sheet). Bake the pizza for about 13 minutes or until cheese is bubbling. Using peel, transfer pizza to a cutting board. Let the pizza cool for about 5 minutes.

 

Nutritionals (8 servings-dough only) Cal: 135, Fat: 2, Carb: 27, Fiber: 4, Protein: 5